The greenest expedition ship in Antarctica?

In a recent press release, the new Ocean Victory from Danish cruise operator Albatros Expeditions states it can deliver the lowest Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions per passenger in the industry.

The success of the vessel’s environmental performance seems to be due to its unique features (e.g. modern engines, efficient designed bow etc) all of which make the ship use 60% less energy, according to the owner and founder of Albatros Expeditions’ partner company, Albatros Travel Group, Søren Rasmussen.

First of all, Ocean Victory has Tier III compliant engines, the cleanest engines in the world that limit the amount of nitrous oxides. Secondly, we only burn marine gas oil, which emits less CO2 per ton burned compared to a heavier bunker fuel. Thirdly, the patented and revolutionary Ulstein X-bow is fantastically efficient, especially with surf and in rougher seas. And lastly, Ocean Victory has a fully optimized compact design, providing comfortable space for 185 guests in only 104 meters length and just over 8000 gross tonnage,” Albatros’ President Hans Lagerweij explained.

The vessel is part of a brand new generation of low-energy vessels, with 4 diesel engines and 2 electro engines, all controlled electronically to optimize speed and fuel consumption.

The Ocean Victory has just finished her sea trials and will be deployed and dedicated to the Antarctic region voyages, with bookings available from November 2021.

With the highest Polar code 6 and Ice class 1A, Ocean Victory is considered an ideal vessel for small-ship cruising due to her sturdy construction and X-Bow®-Infinity class, which provides high stability in rough weather and allows for the smoothest movements on high waves, and a Solas 2012 classification which facilitates a safe return to port.

We look forward to the day when we can replace the last 40 percent with sustainable fuel,” Rasmussen said. “We received our first sustainable travel award back in 1997 when most of the industry had no clue what sustainable travel meant, so of course, we are always wanting to aim higher and find new solutions,” he added.

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